12 Days of Geek | Day 1 | That’s a spicy pepper

Q. The heat of a chili pepper is measured using what scale?


By dissolving dried peppers in alcohol to extract their heat components and feeding the results to a panel of trained human taste testers, an American pharmacist was able to measure the pungency (spicy heat level) of chili peppers and other spicy foods. While his method may lack precision due to human subjectivity, it continues to be the most popular measure of spice.

It is, of course, the Scoville scale.


What’s your spice tolerance?

15,000,000 | Pure Capsaicin
1,500,000–2,200,000 | Carolina Reaper, Trinidad Scorpion, Pepper Spray
855,000–1,100,000 | Ghost Pepper
350,000–855,000 | Red Savina Habanero, Indian Tezpur
100,000–350,000 | Habanero, Scotch Bonnet, Bird’s Eye
30,000–50,000 | Cayenne, Tabasco
10,000–25,000 | Serrano
2,500–5,000 | Jalapeño, Poblano
1,000–1,500 | Ancho, Anaheim
100–1,000 | Cherry, Peperoncino
0–Bell Pepper



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