A Shoutout to Amazon Mayday: A Turning Point for Video-Enabled Customer Service

For those of you who have been tuning in to primetime television within the last two weeks, you have likely seen this Amazon Kindle Fire HDX commercial. (And if you haven’t, it’s worth a pause on your DVR):

Amazon has announced a new support service available on its Kindle Fire HDX product called, “Mayday.” This support feature allows users to connect with a live customer service representative with the click of a button to troubleshoot issues related to their tablet. Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, Mayday connects you with a live support representative within 15 seconds and the tech advisor can even draw on your screen to walk you through various steps.

Why use live video chat?

Working with tech support or customer service representatives can be hit or miss. Sometimes you work with an incredibly helpful individual who can address all of your concerns quickly and easy, and other times you feel like you’re constantly being placed on hold or shuffled around from person to person. Having a live technician speaking to you face to face eliminates a lot of the frustration that we often experience with audio support calls. Not to mention, when you’re trying to build positive brand experiences, live interactions can go so much farther than hearing a voice over the phone or sending instant messages. After all, 93 percent of communication is non-verbal and if you want to help ensure that your tech support is clearly understood and your customer is happy, video is your best bet.

Why haven’t more companies tried this?

The truth of the matter is that this technology is still a ways off from being mainstream, but we’re getting closer every day. Just think of WebRTC (web real-time communications). This technology allows you to connect over video through your browser without the need for plug-ins, software clients, logins or passwords. In fact, LifeSize has a WebRTC beta application you can try to see how this works. Once WebRTC technology takes off, any company with a website (and a ready-and-willing customer service department) can implement video-enabled support. It will be as easy as the Mayday button – one click and you’re connected.

Props to Amazon

Amazon truly understands the value of face to face communications through this new support application. Based on the hype it is getting, we wouldn’t be surprised if more companies tried to adapt this technology for their own app or website. With WebRTC, the possibilities are endless. Amazon is just scratching the surface at what video technology will be able to accomplish.

What do you think? Is Amazon Mayday an awesome idea? Would you use it if you had a Kindle Fire HDX? Or do you think it’s gimmicky? Let us know in the comment box below.

This entry was posted in Changing the Way the World Communicates, Features, Industry, Miscellaneous, Mobility, People, Products, Technology, Trends, Unified Communications, vLog, WebRTC. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to A Shoutout to Amazon Mayday: A Turning Point for Video-Enabled Customer Service

  1. sac says:

    yes,i think it is an awesome idea.i would wish to use it.

  2. Mark says:

    The demonstration seems quite slick on the commercial.
    I hope for amazons sake that they have thought this through though. 93% of communication is non verbal, but if the staff training is not absolutely spot on, the blank expression will not give great customer confidence.
    Still, the prof is in the pudding. Great idea if they can pull it off.
    I sincerely hope they can.

    • jsteele says:

      That’s a great point, Mark. In order for this video service to be effective, the support technicians must be properly trained! It will be interesting to see how Amazon rolls this out and what the customer feedback is like.

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