Adaptive Motion Control – What It Is and Why You Need It

by Leanna Holmquist, Contributing Writer

If you use HD video conferencing in business, you know the realistic, “reach-out-and-touch-someone” communications experience that only HD technology can provide. But what’s the secret to that beautiful clarity, color, and in-person look and feel? In a word: packet wrangling (OK, two words).

Getting the pesky packets of data that carry your video and audio information to where they need to go without using large amounts of bandwidth is both a science and an art. LifeSize accomplishes this through Adaptive Motion Control (AMC) with Forward Error Correction (FEC).

To understand Adaptive Motion Control with Forward Error Correction, let’s first look at an oversimplified analogy of how packets work.

Packets (Photo Courtesy of Wikipedia)

All in all, a packet is just an envelope of data that is passed through levels of internet servers until it reaches its target address. Similar to an envelope – a packet has a mailing address and a return address and carries a chunk of data which is like the “letter.” However, since a packet can only contain a small amount of data – about 1,500 characters – to send a novel over the Internet, for instance, many thousands of packets must be sent. But each packet can be carried by a different letter carrier, and some letter carriers are efficient and others are lazy. Some just burn their letters or bury them in the back yard because they don’t feel like working, and sometimes weasels grab the packets and run off with them and use them to renovate their weasel habitats. So things can get problematic, which is when packet loss happens.

Packet Weasel (Photo Courtesy of Wikipedia)

When one or more packets of data traveling across a computer network fail to reach their destination, packet loss occurs. It can be caused by a number of factors, including signal degradation, channel congestion, corrupted packets, faulty networking hardware, faulty network drivers or normal routing routines Lost or dropped packets can result in highly noticeable performance issues which can affect audio, video and/or data components, thereby affecting the entire quality of the video conferencing experience. Video is the most susceptible to packet loss, since it utilizes the majority of data. You may have experienced packet loss in your past video experiences, such as blocking, distortion, smearing, flickering, audio/video synchronization problems and freezing frames.

Image Depicting Packet Chaos

Thus, packet loss can wreak havoc on your video conferencing signal, as the dramatic image of packet chaos to the right illustrates.

Frightening, isn’t it? In order to prevent this from happening, LifeSize uses Adaptive Motion Control with Forward Error Correction technology to keep video and audio quality from being degraded. Not only is clarity degradation distracting during a video call, it reduces the immersive feeling of being there in the same meeting room.

In most environments, bandwidth availability is dynamic and sometimes unpredictable. LifeSize AMC with FEC acts as the “brain” of the video architecture. It allows the system to adapt to changing network conditions, auto-negotiating in real time to overcome network congestion and deliver an optimal videoconferencing experience.

Packet Harmony

The result is genuine, face-to-face, HD quality collaboration with no compromises.

Want to know more? Click here to learn about LifeSize AMC and read a whitepaper full of fascinating facts.

 

Image depicting Packet Chaos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frightening, isn’t it? In order to prevent this from happening, LifeSize uses Adaptive Motion Control with Forward Error Correction technology to keep video and audio quality from being degraded. Not only is clarity degradation distracting during a video call, it reduces the immersive feeling of being there in the same meeting room.